Civilized Violence Lessons from Gun Schools by Harel Shapira at Wake Forest University
Firearms / Personal Defense

Civilized Violence Lessons from Gun Schools by Harel Shapira at Wake Forest University

I am excited to host University of Texas sociologist Harel Shapira today at Wake Forest University. Dr. Shapira will be speaking about his research on gun schools in Texas. I have never met Shapira and have not seen any of his ongoing research, but am looking forward to meeting him and hearing his presentation. I … Continue reading

EVENT CANCELED: An Education in Violence: Teaching and Learning to Kill in America
Personal Defense

EVENT CANCELED: An Education in Violence: Teaching and Learning to Kill in America

SO, I APPARENTLY JINXED THINGS BY FINALLY ANNOUNCING THIS EVENT BECAUSE UNFORTUNATELY THE SPEAKER HAS HAD TO CANCEL LAST MINUTE. I AM LEAVING THE INFORMATION ABOUT THE TALK HERE, THOUGH, AS I AM HOPING TO RESCHEDULE THE LECTURE FOR THE FALL 2016 SEMESTER! PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT: I am excited to be hosting Dr. Harel Shapira of … Continue reading

African Americans Carrying Guns
Concealed Carry / Firearms / Personal Defense

African Americans Carrying Guns

In my sociology of guns class this week and next, we are reading and discussing Jennifer Carlson’s book Citizen-Protectors: The Everyday Politics of Guns in an Age of Decline. Today I want to reflect some on the issue of race and gun carrying, reflections occasioned by Carlson’s book. As noted previously, Carlson’s study is focused … Continue reading

Justified or Not? “Rash” of Self-Defense Shootings in Tulsa This Year
Firearms / Personal Defense

Justified or Not? “Rash” of Self-Defense Shootings in Tulsa This Year

A fellow sociologist asked the other day, “What’s the matter with Tulsa?” My immediate response was that Tulsa’s violent crime rate of 12.66 per 1,000 residents is 3 times the national average of 3.8 (and nearly 3 times Oklahoma’s rate of 4.41). According to Neighborhood Scout’s crime index, Tulsa is 3 out of 100 – … Continue reading

More on Dismissed Research on Gun Shot Victims in Chicago
Firearms

More on Dismissed Research on Gun Shot Victims in Chicago

In a couple of previous posts (here and here), I promised to say more about a recent article on nonfatal gunshot injuries that was treated dismissively on another blog: “Tragic, but not random: The social contagion of nonfatal gunshot injuries,” by Andrew V. Papachristos, Christopher Wildeman, and Elizabeth Roberto, published in Social Science and Medicine, … Continue reading